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A secret revealed…

Benedict Cumberbatch plays the brilliant and tragic Alan Turing

Benedict Cumberbatch plays the brilliant and tragic Alan Turing

 

Accolades are pouring in for the movie The Imitation Game – featuring an amazing performance by Benedict Cumberbatch as the Enigma code-breaker Alan Turing.

The movie has served to focus attention on Turing and his work at the secret Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park. It’s also served to highlight the injustice of the treatment he received when he was convicted for what was then a crime – being homosexual.

Recently I visited Bletchley Park – that was before the movie publicity began, and my knowledge of what happened there was pretty sketchy.

The old saying is right – truth is sometimes much stranger – much better – than fiction.

The first thing that struck me about the place was its size. At the height of its activity – there were 9,000 people working there. Most of those were billeted with local families. Everyone MUST have seen those thousands of people entering the site every day. Yet the secret was never revealed. Can you imagine that happening in this day of mobile phone cameras and social media?

A rare image of the code-breakers at work

A rare image of the code-breakers at work

Not only that – the secret was kept for years after the war. A book released in 1974 broke the silence – but it wasn’t until the place was at risk of demolition in 1991 that moves began to conserve the site and tell its remarkable story.

The buildings that once housed the code-breakers have been turned into a fascinating museum – we went planning to spend a couple of hours, and were there the whole day.

The huts have been restored to how they looked during the war.

The huts have been restored to how they looked during the war.

The guides did their best to explain how the codes were broken – and how the famous bombe machine works – but it wasn’t easy to understand. I like to think I’m reasonable intelligent – but I stood in awe of Turing and his team and the work that they did – work which formed the basis of so much of our daily lives today. Every computer, every computerised system – owes something to the work done at Bletchley Park.

Before Alan Turing's breakthroughs, the code was cracked by sliding bits of paper through slots in pages covered with letters.

Before Alan Turing’s breakthroughs, the code was cracked by sliding bits of paper through slots in pages covered with letters.

 

Some of the original papers have survived - with the code-breakers scribbles still intact

Some of the original papers have survived – with the code-breakers scribbles still intact

 

Towards the end of the day – we were watching a demonstration of the Bombe machine – and the guide told us a story…

Not all that long ago, he was giving a demonstration, to a group which included an elderly couple. When he was finished, the woman said – It wasn’t quite like that – but you almost got it right.

She then admitted she had worked in one of the huts during the war. Her husband turned to her, shock on his face. She had never told him. Just as he had never told her that he had also worked there – in one of the other huts. They worked just a few yards apart, but didn’t meet until after the war. In their long marriage, until that day, neither had ever told the secret they held.

Churchill ordered the machines and their plans to be destroyed after the war - but some have been rebuilt and they even work!

Churchill ordered the machines and their plans to be destroyed after the war – but some have been rebuilt and they even work!

To this day Bletchley Park keeps its secrets.

People who worked there during the war have been approached to tell their stories – so that the history can be preserved. Some have agreed to do so – now that the war is long past and the secret is out. But others have declined – saying they would still abide by the official secrets act that they signed so long ago.

They Enigma machine that created the codes. I was surprised to learn it was commercially available before the war - but modified before encoding Nazi secrets.

They Enigma machine that created the codes. I was surprised to learn is was commercially available before the war – but modified before encoding Nazi secrets.

Alan Turing was convicted of gross indecency in 1952 and sentenced to chemical castration. He lost his security clearance – even though there was no evidence he was a spy. And he was removed from all his ongoing government work. Turing died of cyanide poisoning in 1954. He was 41 years old. It was ruled a suicide, but that has been disputed by people who believe it was an accident. His story reached an ending of sorts just a few months ago. In August of this year, the Queen officially pardoned him.

Alan Turing - what a brilliant mind he was.

Alan Turing – what a brilliant mind he was.

There are still buildings at Bletchley that are closed to the public, and not restored… yet. I wonder what stories they have to tell.

 

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10 Responses to A secret revealed…

  • How fascinating! I got chills from reading this post. Alan Turing was brilliant and it’s a shame what happened to him. I personally believe sexual orientation has no bearing on intelligence and brilliance.

    I loved the story of the two code breakers sitting in nearby huts. It’s astonishing that they kept their word to keep their jobs a secret for so long.

    • Hi Chanpreet – Turing must have had the most amazing mind. Being in the rooms where they worked was quite moving. I have been captivated by the story of the elderly couple – and wonder that love and a marriage could last so long, with such a big secret kept by both sides. I wonder if they each struggled at times to say nothing. I am sure there’s a story waiting there for me …. J X

  • What a brilliant post Janet, thank you so much. Its a disgrace how Alan Turing was treated and a lesson to us now not to make similar mistakes.

    • Hi Lynne. Glad you enjoyed the post. Turing’s story is so sad – and he was just one of many who were treated to badly. Thankfully times change. J X

  • What a great insight, Janet, into the world of Bletchley Park. The story of Alan Turing and the elderly couple are very thought-provoking. I too felt very moved reading about both Alan Turing and the elderly couple, and yes, I’m sure there is a story waiting there for you…

    • Thanks Julie… I find places like that can be so inspiring. The bookshop at Bletchley park is full of what look like fascinating books about its history and the people who worked there. I am sure there would be room for a little fiction in there too 🙂

  • Fascinating post, Janet. It’s a place my husband and I both want to visit. I can understand the keeping of secrets as there are things Richard has never told me about his time in the US Navy and probably never will.

    • Hi Angela. My father-in-law worked at the Royal Aircraft Establishment research centre at Farnborough Airbase. He’s long retired – but he also doesn’t talk about his work. You have to admire the loyalty of people who keep those secrets.

  • Fascinating post, Janet – and I loved the story about the couple keeping their secrets for so long. Bletchley Park must be brimming over with stories – human and military!

    • Glad you enjoyed it Katy – it really was a fascinating place. They have done a great job of preserving the history – but also giving visitors a glimpse into the daily lives of the people who worked there. I would really recommend it if you get a chance to visit.

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